Wednesday March 29th 2017

‘Recent Work’ Archives

Moon twinkles

Moon twinkles

If you ever travel to the moon, don’t forget to pack a heavy-duty umbrella. It’s not for downpours: With no atmosphere, there’s no chance of rain. But hundreds of times each year, small space rocks smash into the lunar surface, flashing brightly enough to be seen from [Read More]

Mapping the invisible

Mapping the invisible

Most maps show places you can visit and how to get there. Most maps, however, were not made by astronomers — physicists who study stars and galaxies far, far, far away. At a recent meeting in Texas, three teams of these scientists presented new maps unlike any atlas, [Read More]

Introducing silicene

Introducing silicene

Electronics engineers are constantly seeking the next great thing, the supermaterial that will allow for devices even smaller and faster than are possible with silicon chips. But research from this year has convinced some people that silicon’s successor may be none other [Read More]

The secret songs of giant beavers

The secret songs of giant beavers

Giant beavers, which vanished from North America about 10,000 years ago, had a secret in their heads: a long compartment that stretched from front to back in the animals’ skull. Caroline Rinaldi, a paleontologist who studies extinct mammals, may have figured out the [Read More]

Dolphin dimples detect electricity

Dolphin dimples detect electricity

  German scientists have found that Guiana dolphins can detect tiny electric fields using special organs in their snouts — which may help them pick up the scent of a future meal. This Science News for Kids snapshot was adapted from a Science News story by Nadia [Read More]

Fast Bladderworts

Fast Bladderworts

How fast do bladderworts suck? I wrote about this question for a recent episode of the Loh Down on Science. [Read More]

The Little Chefs

The Little Chefs

I wrote this profile of Sam’s school for Local Table, a magazine about food and farms in central Tennessee. Read it here. [Read More]

Sea Changes

Sea Changes

Every day, the ocean absorbs about 22 million tons of carbon dioxide, which is about the weight of 15 million hybrid automobiles. Just as you can’t see the carbon dioxide that comes out of your own body each time you exhale, you can’t see the gas as it dissolves into [Read More]

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Latest Topics

How nonequilibrium thermodynamics speaks to the mystery of life

How nonequilibrium thermodynamics speaks to the mystery of life

In his 1944 book What is Life?, Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger argued that organisms stay alive precisely by [Read More]

Solving a math problem to create art

Solving a math problem to create art

Optimization is the mathematical quest for the best way to do something, from finding the shortest distance between two [Read More]

The Internet of Things wants to link all facets of our world

The Internet of Things wants to link all facets of our world

A 94Fifty looks like an ordinary basketball. You can inflate, dribble, pass, shoot, swoosh and slam-dunk it. But [Read More]

When your stuff spies on you

When your stuff spies on you

In October 2016, hackers hit a company called Dyn. Hackers are people who write computer programs that can break into [Read More]

The return of supersolids!

The return of supersolids!

We learn it from a young age: solids hold their shapes; liquids flow. Physical states of matter are mutually exclusive. [Read More]

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