Monday September 25th 2017

‘Recent Work’ Archives

Flipping Icebergs

Flipping Icebergs

Icebergs look like towering, frozen mountains that drift through water. Their peaks may soar hundreds of feet above the surface and large ones cover as much area as major cities. When one of these blocks of ice flips over, it causes a great splash. In recent experiments at [Read More]

You can’t copyright pi

You can’t copyright pi

The mathematical constant pi continues to infinity, but an extraordinary lawsuit that centred on this most beloved string of digits has come to an end. Appropriately, the decision was made on Pi Day. On 14 March, which commemorates the constant that begins 3.14, US [Read More]

Graphene Girl Scout Cookies

Graphene Girl Scout Cookies

It’s cookie season! Can the Girl Scouts revolutionize electronics? Find out by listening to this podcast from the Loh Down on Science.     [Read More]

Moon twinkles

Moon twinkles

If you ever travel to the moon, don’t forget to pack a heavy-duty umbrella. It’s not for downpours: With no atmosphere, there’s no chance of rain. But hundreds of times each year, small space rocks smash into the lunar surface, flashing brightly enough to be seen from [Read More]

Mapping the invisible

Mapping the invisible

Most maps show places you can visit and how to get there. Most maps, however, were not made by astronomers — physicists who study stars and galaxies far, far, far away. At a recent meeting in Texas, three teams of these scientists presented new maps unlike any atlas, [Read More]

Introducing silicene

Introducing silicene

Electronics engineers are constantly seeking the next great thing, the supermaterial that will allow for devices even smaller and faster than are possible with silicon chips. But research from this year has convinced some people that silicon’s successor may be none other [Read More]

The secret songs of giant beavers

The secret songs of giant beavers

Giant beavers, which vanished from North America about 10,000 years ago, had a secret in their heads: a long compartment that stretched from front to back in the animals’ skull. Caroline Rinaldi, a paleontologist who studies extinct mammals, may have figured out the [Read More]

Dolphin dimples detect electricity

Dolphin dimples detect electricity

  German scientists have found that Guiana dolphins can detect tiny electric fields using special organs in their snouts — which may help them pick up the scent of a future meal. This Science News for Kids snapshot was adapted from a Science News story by Nadia [Read More]

Fast Bladderworts

Fast Bladderworts

How fast do bladderworts suck? I wrote about this question for a recent episode of the Loh Down on Science. [Read More]

The Little Chefs

The Little Chefs

I wrote this profile of Sam’s school for Local Table, a magazine about food and farms in central Tennessee. Read it here. [Read More]

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Latest Topics

Resurrecting the Riverkeepers

Resurrecting the Riverkeepers

Under cover of darkness, thieves dove into the inky waters of Tennessee’s river sanctuaries and scooped up [Read More]

Predicting the whirlwind

Predicting the whirlwind

  In more than 20 years as a meteorologist, Joshua Wurman had seen – and chased – more than 150 tornadoes. But [Read More]

Auto-focus eyeglasses rely on liquid lenses

Auto-focus eyeglasses rely on liquid lenses

With round lenses set in super-thick frames, these new eyeglasses look like they belong on a cartoon character. But [Read More]

How Bose–Einstein condensates keep revealing weird physics

How Bose–Einstein condensates keep revealing weird physics

A Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), the first of which was shown experimentally 22 years ago, isn’t your garden variety [Read More]

Seeking a Second Opinion

Seeking a Second Opinion

In November 2012, when she was 52 years old, Shannon Semple was diagnosed with a disease she didn’t have. She credits [Read More]

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