Sunday May 28th 2017

‘Recent Work’ Archives

Riding raindrops

Riding raindrops

  To humans, falling rain usually amounts to little more than a minor inconvenience. After all, we are big and raindrops are small – they splatter on our heads and sleeves, and we end up a little wetter. But a mosquito’s mass is only 2–3 μg and the largest [Read More]

Tennessee’s bat cave

Tennessee’s bat cave

  MONTGOMERY COUNTY, TENN. — The world’s first artificial bat cave is expecting the arrival of its first winged visitors. The nearly 80-foot-long concrete chamber was built to protect bats against white nose syndrome, a disease named for a white fungus that infects [Read More]

Aspirin for cancer prevention?

Aspirin for cancer prevention?

  The potential benefits of taking aspirin every day to lower the risk of heart attacks and strokes are well-known. Now a trio of reports, two from the Lancet and one from Lancet Oncology, suggest that a daily dose of aspirin may also reduce the risk of developing [Read More]

Icy inns at Earth’s end

Icy inns at Earth’s end

  This year marks the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic, reminding us once again of the deadly threat icebergs can pose to life. Still, the bad reputation icebergs sometimes have isn’t entirely deserved — even if the scientists who study these [Read More]

Hot technology

Hot technology

Almost every device that needs energy also wastes energy. Cars get their zip by burning gasoline, but that process heats up the car — and that heat is wasted energy. Computer batteries get hot when they’re in use; so do cell phones and kitchen appliances. All that hot [Read More]

Agent Higgs game turns real particle hunt on its head

Agent Higgs game turns real particle hunt on its head

    As the world waits for the next installment of news in the hunt for the Higgs boson, a simple smart phone game encourages players to hide, not hunt, the world’s favourite particle.    Read more in this New Scientist article.    [Read More]

Common Sense

Common Sense

Unlike Luke Skywalker, maybe you can’t feel the force. But can you see it? Listen to this Loh Down on Science episode to find out.  [Read More]

Flipping Icebergs

Flipping Icebergs

Icebergs look like towering, frozen mountains that drift through water. Their peaks may soar hundreds of feet above the surface and large ones cover as much area as major cities. When one of these blocks of ice flips over, it causes a great splash. In recent experiments at [Read More]

You can’t copyright pi

You can’t copyright pi

The mathematical constant pi continues to infinity, but an extraordinary lawsuit that centred on this most beloved string of digits has come to an end. Appropriately, the decision was made on Pi Day. On 14 March, which commemorates the constant that begins 3.14, US [Read More]

Graphene Girl Scout Cookies

Graphene Girl Scout Cookies

It’s cookie season! Can the Girl Scouts revolutionize electronics? Find out by listening to this podcast from the Loh Down on Science.     [Read More]

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Latest Topics

How nonequilibrium thermodynamics speaks to the mystery of life

How nonequilibrium thermodynamics speaks to the mystery of life

In his 1944 book What is Life?, Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger argued that organisms stay alive precisely by [Read More]

Solving a math problem to create art

Solving a math problem to create art

Optimization is the mathematical quest for the best way to do something, from finding the shortest distance between two [Read More]

The Internet of Things wants to link all facets of our world

The Internet of Things wants to link all facets of our world

A 94Fifty looks like an ordinary basketball. You can inflate, dribble, pass, shoot, swoosh and slam-dunk it. But [Read More]

When your stuff spies on you

When your stuff spies on you

In October 2016, hackers hit a company called Dyn. Hackers are people who write computer programs that can break into [Read More]

The return of supersolids!

The return of supersolids!

We learn it from a young age: solids hold their shapes; liquids flow. Physical states of matter are mutually exclusive. [Read More]

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