Wednesday March 29th 2017

‘For Kids’ Archives

Electronic skin

Electronic skin

  James Bond and his enemies would be interested in the goings-on at the laboratory of John Rogers. So would Batman, the Spy Kids, Darth Vader and their enemies. That’s because Rogers, a materials scientist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, mixes [Read More]

Self-cleaning clothes

Self-cleaning clothes

Cleaning clothes usually requires soap and water to remove stains and smells, and a tumble in the dryer or an afternoon on the clothesline to dry. The time and energy needed to turn a heap of dirty laundry into a pile of clean clothes might make people wish for clothes that [Read More]

Searching for underground water, from the sky

Searching for underground water, from the sky

Keeping track of water makes for tricky science. It drains through soil, slips through cracks in rocks and refills underwater reserves. It bubbles up through springs and runs in rivers. Water evaporates and forms clouds; rain brings it back to earth, where it keeps plants [Read More]

What a dream looks like

What a dream looks like

The ability to take a picture of a dream sounds like something that’s possible only in a dream, but a team of researchers in Germany has done just that. Brain scan images taken during specific dreamed events may help researchers understand how the brain combines thoughts [Read More]

Double sunsets on a distant world

Double sunsets on a distant world

If you were stranded on a recently discovered planet called Kepler-16b and looked up during the day, you’d see an unusual light show: two glowing orbs making their way across the sky. Read more about the new Tattooine in this article from Science News for Kids, which came [Read More]

Cars of the Future

Cars of the Future

We won’t be driving the cars of the future; more likely, they’ll be driving us. They’ll park themselves, run on electricity, never get lost, and come when you call (with an app, on your phone). Meet the cars of the future in this story from Science News [Read More]

Dolphin dimples detect electricity

Dolphin dimples detect electricity

  German scientists have found that Guiana dolphins can detect tiny electric fields using special organs in their snouts — which may help them pick up the scent of a future meal. This Science News for Kids snapshot was adapted from a Science News story by Nadia [Read More]

Lotion takes a bite out of snake venom

Lotion takes a bite out of snake venom

For a person who has the rotten luck to get bitten by a poisonous snake, every second counts. That’s because venom can spread quickly from the site of the bite to the rest of the body, causing pain, suffering — even death. Australian scientists now have found a way to [Read More]

Not Seeing Sunspots

Not Seeing Sunspots

The sun’s next cycle is off to a slow start, say researchers at the National Solar Observatory in Tucson. This short news article for kids is adapted from a Science News article by Ron Cowen. [Read More]

Tsunami, from the sky

Tsunami, from the sky

The tsunami that struck Japan shook up the atmosphere, too. It caused airglow ripples that chased the giant waves across the Pacific; scientists in Hawaii caught photos of the fleeing waves. I wrote a short article for Science News for Kids about this finding; my snapshot [Read More]

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Latest Topics

How nonequilibrium thermodynamics speaks to the mystery of life

How nonequilibrium thermodynamics speaks to the mystery of life

In his 1944 book What is Life?, Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger argued that organisms stay alive precisely by [Read More]

Solving a math problem to create art

Solving a math problem to create art

Optimization is the mathematical quest for the best way to do something, from finding the shortest distance between two [Read More]

The Internet of Things wants to link all facets of our world

The Internet of Things wants to link all facets of our world

A 94Fifty looks like an ordinary basketball. You can inflate, dribble, pass, shoot, swoosh and slam-dunk it. But [Read More]

When your stuff spies on you

When your stuff spies on you

In October 2016, hackers hit a company called Dyn. Hackers are people who write computer programs that can break into [Read More]

The return of supersolids!

The return of supersolids!

We learn it from a young age: solids hold their shapes; liquids flow. Physical states of matter are mutually exclusive. [Read More]

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