Friday April 25th 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Loh Down on Science’

A speed limit for birds

A speed limit for birds

Fly free! Fly fast! Just not too fast… This show aired August 31 on the Loh Down on Science. [Read More]

Graphene Girl Scout Cookies

Graphene Girl Scout Cookies

It’s cookie season! Can the Girl Scouts revolutionize electronics? Find out by listening to this podcast from the Loh Down on Science.     [Read More]

Green Hornets

Green Hornets

Oriental wasps turn ultraviolet light into energy, say researchers from Tel Aviv University. Listen to this show from the Loh Down on Science to learn more. [Read More]

Drugs with Bad Vibes

Drugs with Bad Vibes

  Question: Which has the biggest impact on global warming: A coal-fired power plant, 1,000,000 cars, or the global total of inhaled anesthetics – those dreamy drugs that knock you out for surgery? This show from the Loh Down on Science has the answer. It aired [Read More]

Spotless Mice Minds

Spotless Mice Minds

Neuroscientists from Johns Hopkins found a way to permanently wipe some memories from mouse minds. I wrote this script for the Loh Down on Science. Listen here. [Read More]

Fast Bladderworts

Fast Bladderworts

How fast do bladderworts suck? I wrote about this question for a recent episode of the Loh Down on Science. [Read More]

Latest Topics

Burning to learn

Burning to learn

  In central California’s Yosemite National Park, it doesn’t take much to set the forest on fire. A discarded [Read More]

Paging Dr. Data

Paging Dr. Data

For doctors who treat trauma patients, prediction is key: Will a patient die in the next 30 minutes? Why or why not? [Read More]

Numbers and verse

Numbers and verse

  The universe is a grand book, Galileo noted in 1623, written in the language of mathematics. Those poor souls [Read More]

Two Guys Dancing about Math

Two Guys Dancing about Math

  A typical performance by dancers Karl Schaffer and Erik Stern begins with a handshake. However, it’s not [Read More]

Northern Hibernaculum

Northern Hibernaculum

  For years, biologist Susi von Oettingen at the US Fish and Wildlife Service tracked the devastation in New [Read More]

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