Thursday September 29th 2016

Posts Tagged ‘cancer’

The Power of 1

The Power of 1

Kent Haffer remembers when his oncologist approached him with an unusual idea. It was 2013, and Haffer, a 55-year-old computer programmer living in St. Peters, Missouri, had been receiving treatment for advanced melanoma for eight years. His oncologist proposed that Haffer [Read More]

A Desire to Help

A Desire to Help

Children can be many things. Joyful, energetic and exasperating. Curious, playful and sad. For P.J. Lukac, who is finishing his pediatrics residency at Chicago’s Rush University Medical Center, children are also a source of inspiration and hope. “They’re a joy to work [Read More]

More than a signature

More than a signature

  Three days before Christmas in 1995, Linda Horton, a medical researcher in Nashville, Tenn., was diagnosed with a large, fast-growing tumor in her breast. She quickly began her treatment course: chemotherapy to shrink the tumor, followed by a mastectomy—her doctors [Read More]

Cutting Cancer’s Engine

Cutting Cancer’s Engine

Not every hypothesis in cancer research has the same staying power. Some emerge with fanfare and hype, only to fade when follow-up research fails to support a promising theory—or when an upstart steals the spotlight. But even when a promising idea gets pushed aside, [Read More]

Teaming up for better treatment

Teaming up for better treatment

In 2003, Marlene Nusbaum learned firsthand how differently the world can appear to someone undergoing cancer treatment. Diagnosed with stage II breast cancer, the 54-year-old business executive–turned–French teacher dutifully reported to the 
Dana-Farber Cancer [Read More]

Aspirin for cancer prevention?

Aspirin for cancer prevention?

  The potential benefits of taking aspirin every day to lower the risk of heart attacks and strokes are well-known. Now a trio of reports, two from the Lancet and one from Lancet Oncology, suggest that a daily dose of aspirin may also reduce the risk of developing [Read More]

Interrupting cancer’s travel plans

Interrupting cancer’s travel plans

Randy Watnickʼs pursuit of a better drug against metastatic cancer began late at night in early 2005. His infant daughter had woken up in tears at their home in Newton, Mass., near Boston. The molecular biologist climbed out of bed, scooped up the sobbing baby, and helped [Read More]

Nashville’s Clean-Eating Crusader

Nashville’s Clean-Eating Crusader

For CR magazine, I wrote a profile of Randy Pendergrass, a cancer survivor and nutritionist at St. Thomas Hospital here in Nashville. Read it here. [Read More]

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The Endgame of Ruby Knuckles

The Endgame of Ruby Knuckles

The Endgame of Ruby Knuckles Published in 2011 in Arcadia That Sunday morning, I was not full of the Holy Ghost. I [Read More]

What medicine can learn from squid teeth

What medicine can learn from squid teeth

Many types of squid have razor-sharp teeth. They just are not where you’d expect to find them. Each of the [Read More]

The value of a good science hack

The value of a good science hack

Physicist Matt Bellis attended his first Science Hack Day in the fall of 2010, in Palo Alto, California. Like many [Read More]

Preserving the Past

Preserving the Past

The George Eastman Museum in Rochester, New York, is the oldest photography museum in the world. The Victorian mansion [Read More]

Let the structural symphony begin

Let the structural symphony begin

Like other structural biologists, Eva Nogales works in extraordinary times. The University of California, Berkeley, [Read More]

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