Thursday June 22nd 2017

Posts Tagged ‘astronomy’

Are we alone?

Are we alone?

  If aliens ever sent us a message, scientists hope to pick it up in a remote part of northern California.   There, in a clearing nestled amid the volcanoes of the Cascade Range, 42 radio dishes point together at the sky. The dishes, each 20 feet across, form a [Read More]

Bringing down the trash

Bringing down the trash

The density of junk orbiting the Earth is at or near a critical value beyond which this man-made debris will self-perpetuate, forming many smaller pieces that are even more of a problem.I wrote this article for Physics World about the latest ideas about how to bring down [Read More]

Moon twinkles

Moon twinkles

If you ever travel to the moon, don’t forget to pack a heavy-duty umbrella. It’s not for downpours: With no atmosphere, there’s no chance of rain. But hundreds of times each year, small space rocks smash into the lunar surface, flashing brightly enough to be seen from [Read More]

Mapping the invisible

Mapping the invisible

Most maps show places you can visit and how to get there. Most maps, however, were not made by astronomers — physicists who study stars and galaxies far, far, far away. At a recent meeting in Texas, three teams of these scientists presented new maps unlike any atlas, [Read More]

Not Seeing Sunspots

Not Seeing Sunspots

The sun’s next cycle is off to a slow start, say researchers at the National Solar Observatory in Tucson. This short news article for kids is adapted from a Science News article by Ron Cowen. [Read More]

End of an Era

End of an Era

I wrote about the end of the space shuttle program for Science News for Kids. Here’s the whole story. [Read More]

The Dark Side of the Universe

The Dark Side of the Universe

I wrote this feature about dark matter and dark energy for Science News for Kids. Read the whole story here. Photo credit: NASA, ESA, and Dan Coe   [Read More]

Planets with screwy orbits

Planets with screwy orbits

Ever since astronomers started finding planets orbiting other stars, they have been learning just how rich and peculiar the cosmos can be. Recent observations. add yet another head-scratcher: giant gas planets that circle their stars on wildly tilted orbits or go around [Read More]

Latest Topics

Auto-focus eyeglasses rely on liquid lenses

Auto-focus eyeglasses rely on liquid lenses

With round lenses set in super-thick frames, these new eyeglasses look like they belong on a cartoon character. But [Read More]

How Bose–Einstein condensates keep revealing weird physics

How Bose–Einstein condensates keep revealing weird physics

A Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), the first of which was shown experimentally 22 years ago, isn’t your garden variety [Read More]

Seeking a Second Opinion

Seeking a Second Opinion

In November 2012, when she was 52 years old, Shannon Semple was diagnosed with a disease she didn’t have. She credits [Read More]

How nonequilibrium thermodynamics speaks to the mystery of life

How nonequilibrium thermodynamics speaks to the mystery of life

In his 1944 book What is Life?, Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger argued that organisms stay alive precisely by [Read More]

Solving a math problem to create art

Solving a math problem to create art

Optimization is the mathematical quest for the best way to do something, from finding the shortest distance between two [Read More]

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