Tuesday September 27th 2016

Posts Tagged ‘astronomy’

Are we alone?

Are we alone?

  If aliens ever sent us a message, scientists hope to pick it up in a remote part of northern California.   There, in a clearing nestled amid the volcanoes of the Cascade Range, 42 radio dishes point together at the sky. The dishes, each 20 feet across, form a [Read More]

Bringing down the trash

Bringing down the trash

The density of junk orbiting the Earth is at or near a critical value beyond which this man-made debris will self-perpetuate, forming many smaller pieces that are even more of a problem.I wrote this article for Physics World about the latest ideas about how to bring down [Read More]

Moon twinkles

Moon twinkles

If you ever travel to the moon, don’t forget to pack a heavy-duty umbrella. It’s not for downpours: With no atmosphere, there’s no chance of rain. But hundreds of times each year, small space rocks smash into the lunar surface, flashing brightly enough to be seen from [Read More]

Mapping the invisible

Mapping the invisible

Most maps show places you can visit and how to get there. Most maps, however, were not made by astronomers — physicists who study stars and galaxies far, far, far away. At a recent meeting in Texas, three teams of these scientists presented new maps unlike any atlas, [Read More]

Not Seeing Sunspots

Not Seeing Sunspots

The sun’s next cycle is off to a slow start, say researchers at the National Solar Observatory in Tucson. This short news article for kids is adapted from a Science News article by Ron Cowen. [Read More]

End of an Era

End of an Era

I wrote about the end of the space shuttle program for Science News for Kids. Here’s the whole story. [Read More]

The Dark Side of the Universe

The Dark Side of the Universe

I wrote this feature about dark matter and dark energy for Science News for Kids. Read the whole story here. Photo credit: NASA, ESA, and Dan Coe   [Read More]

Planets with screwy orbits

Planets with screwy orbits

Ever since astronomers started finding planets orbiting other stars, they have been learning just how rich and peculiar the cosmos can be. Recent observations. add yet another head-scratcher: giant gas planets that circle their stars on wildly tilted orbits or go around [Read More]

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The Endgame of Ruby Knuckles

The Endgame of Ruby Knuckles

The Endgame of Ruby Knuckles Published in 2011 in Arcadia That Sunday morning, I was not full of the Holy Ghost. I [Read More]

What medicine can learn from squid teeth

What medicine can learn from squid teeth

Many types of squid have razor-sharp teeth. They just are not where you’d expect to find them. Each of the [Read More]

The value of a good science hack

The value of a good science hack

Physicist Matt Bellis attended his first Science Hack Day in the fall of 2010, in Palo Alto, California. Like many [Read More]

Preserving the Past

Preserving the Past

The George Eastman Museum in Rochester, New York, is the oldest photography museum in the world. The Victorian mansion [Read More]

Let the structural symphony begin

Let the structural symphony begin

Like other structural biologists, Eva Nogales works in extraordinary times. The University of California, Berkeley, [Read More]

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