Saturday November 18th 2017

All about quantum dots

quantumdotsIn September 2015, Philips, an electronics company based in The Netherlands, unveiled a computer monitor that achieved a brilliant color display using quantum dots: semiconductor nanocrystals that can be tuned to glow in any color. The Philips monitor was the first of its kind, following on the heels of the television that uses quantum dots to enhance its backlighting—rolled out by Sony in 2013—and arriving a few months before the anticipated rollout of the first quantum dot-driven smartphone camera sensors, which the company InVisage announced would start appearing in phones in 2016. These screens have the same resolution as high-definition but can reportedly display a wider range of colors—and potentially at a lower cost—than existing devices.

 

Read more at PNAS, here.

 

 

 

 

Image: PlasmaChem

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