Friday June 23rd 2017

Foraging flights

albatrossFirst, he tracked basking sharks—filterfeeding leviathans that look like supersized great whites—in the coastal waters near Great Britain, and then Atlantic cod, leatherback turtles, Magellanic penguins, and bigeye tuna. He’s wrangled and tagged ocean sunfish, blue sharks, and shortfin mako sharks (and claims success by the fact that he still has all his fingers).

Only after David Sims had exhausted many other species did he find his ultimate prey: the albatross. Sims, a senior research fellow at the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, Plymouth, and a marine ecology professor at the University of Southampton, United Kingdom, has tracked many a species during his career, and it’s all to answer a fundamental ecology question: What’s the best way for an animal to search for small and irregularly distributed pockets of food when it has limited information, and the whole ocean is open to it?

Read more at PNAS.

Next Topic:

More from category

Solving a math problem to create art
Solving a math problem to create art

Optimization is the mathematical quest for the best way to do something, from finding the shortest distance between two [Read More]

Zombie physics
Zombie physics

For Alex Alemi and Matt Bierbaum, physics graduate students at Cornell University in the US, there really was no [Read More]

The Whole Universe Catalog
The Whole Universe Catalog

A seemingly endless variety of food was sprawled over several tables at the home of Judith L. Baxter and her husband, [Read More]

Charting the history of western art with math
Charting the history of western art with math

  For more than a century, researchers have used statistics to study writing style in a sort of literary forensics [Read More]

Can an Equation be a Poem?
Can an Equation be a Poem?

April is Mathematics Awareness Month. April is alsoNational Poetry Month. Coincidence? Yep, almost definitely. But [Read More]

Archives