Wednesday December 7th 2016

Interrupting cancer’s travel plans

Randy Watnickʼs pursuit of a better drug against metastatic cancer began late at night in early 2005. His infant daughter had woken up in tears at their home in Newton, Mass., near Boston. The molecular biologist climbed out of bed, scooped up the sobbing baby, and helped her get back to sleep. Normally able to maintain a healthy distance between work and family, Watnick was unable to fend off thoughts about tumor biology.

“I just couldn’t sleep,” he says. “My daughter woke me up, but what kept me awake was work.”

 

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