Wednesday November 22nd 2017

Tibetan singing bowls

Tibetan singing bowls, ancient instruments used for meditation, can be manipulated to produce droplets that levitate, bounce and skip across water.

When one adds water to a Tibetan singing bowl and plays – often by tracing the edge with a mallet – the bowl’s haunting sound is accompanied by ripples on the water’s surface. That’s because the mallet pushes on the side of the bowl – made from bronze alloy that is more malleable than glass – and deforms it on a microscopic scale.

A new paper from the journal Nonlinearity explores the behavior of water droplets in the bowls. I wrote about it in this article for New Scientist.

 

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