Saturday January 20th 2018

‘Features’ Archives

Edging into the spotlight

Edging into the spotlight

“He had been trying to get his colleague Charles Kane to listen to him, but Kane wasn’t having any of it.” This article about lattices from Physics World covers some arcane ground but was fun to work on.    Image: CC James Mallos via flickr [Read More]

Science behind the scenes

Science behind the scenes

  Jerry Zucker! Natalie Portman! Arthur C. Clarke! My article about the Science & Entertainment Exchange is now up at PNAS. [Read More]

Freeing the dinos within

Freeing the dinos within

Paleontologists have long faced a daunting obstacle to their research: Fossils are usually embedded in rock. To manually wrench the fossils out, scientists use an array of tools, from needles to dentist’s drills to dissolving acids, often with destructive results. Swedish [Read More]

Supersized Viruses

Supersized Viruses

On February 22, festival-goers at Melbourne’s dusk-to-dawn White Night celebration lined up in droves outside the State Library of Victoria for an intimate evening with herpes. And they got it, in a big way: Bobbling around on the 40-meter-diameter central dome on the [Read More]

Mussels’ sticky feet lead to applications

Mussels’ sticky feet lead to applications

  J. Herbert Waite was a graduate student in biochemistry in the 1970s when he began to wonder how mussels cling to rocks in the turbulent intertidal zone, where they slurp nourishing plankton from the water. So in summers and fall, Waite donned Wellington boots and [Read More]

‘Print’ almost anything

‘Print’ almost anything

Imagine having a printer hooked up to your computer that could make anything. Tired of your toothbrush? No problem. Print a new one. Want a chocolate treat? Print it. Need a new dress, new shoes or maybe just new cleats for soccer? Just choose a style and size. Then print, [Read More]

Cutting Cancer’s Engine

Cutting Cancer’s Engine

Not every hypothesis in cancer research has the same staying power. Some emerge with fanfare and hype, only to fade when follow-up research fails to support a promising theory—or when an upstart steals the spotlight. But even when a promising idea gets pushed aside, [Read More]

Riding raindrops

Riding raindrops

  To humans, falling rain usually amounts to little more than a minor inconvenience. After all, we are big and raindrops are small – they splatter on our heads and sleeves, and we end up a little wetter. But a mosquito’s mass is only 2–3 μg and the largest [Read More]

Tennessee’s bat cave

Tennessee’s bat cave

  MONTGOMERY COUNTY, TENN. — The world’s first artificial bat cave is expecting the arrival of its first winged visitors. The nearly 80-foot-long concrete chamber was built to protect bats against white nose syndrome, a disease named for a white fungus that infects [Read More]

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Latest Topics

Fighting Fire with Fire

Fighting Fire with Fire

Robert Kremens fights fire with fire. No, really – that’s his job. Kremens sets fires in a host of locations across [Read More]

Vaccines: Looking Within for Cancer Treament

Vaccines: Looking Within for Cancer Treament

It’s been 10 years since Tom Liebert received an experimental cancer vaccine to treat his multiple myeloma, and he [Read More]

The quantum world is mind-bogglingly weird

The quantum world is mind-bogglingly weird

If you’re interested in the smallest things known to scientists, there’s something you should know. They are [Read More]

Think Like a Hacker

Think Like a Hacker

One winter morning in 2015, as he left for work from his home in Silver Spring, Md., Jonathan Margulies pushed the [Read More]

Creating sculpture with math

Creating sculpture with math

When he was growing up in the 1940s and 1950s, teachers and parents told Helaman Ferguson he would have to choose [Read More]

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